The Little Interview - Ewan McIntosh of No Tosh / by Harry

We were lucky enough to meet Mr McIntosh a while back. What a lovely fella. He is an 'education and digital business maven' and a darn good one at that! Ewan is a busy bee - not only is he a very much sought after consultant and keynote speaker he is the founder of No Tosh, investing in tech startups on behalf of public and private investors. He is a man with his fingers in many pies to say the least!

But we were curious to know what Ewan was like as a wee bairn... so we asked him!

 1) Describe you as a child in 5 words.

Earnest giggler, cantankerous drummer, happy.

2) What is your favourite children’s book?

Fantastic Mr Fox as a child had a certain magic to it, and I seem to remember it being the first 'real' book I read for myself. In fact, anything Roald Dahl did it for me. Now, though, I'd have to say that it's all the Julia Donaldson 'classics'.

3) What was your favourite toy and why?

Lego. I was always one for making it precisely as it was in the plans, and then, over time, 'improving' it with my own brand of seven-year-old urban planning. "What do you mean you can't have a monorail passing through a medieval castle?"

4) If you could be a fictional character from a children's TV show/film/book for a day who would it be and what would you do?

A hard one this, as most of the characters I like are really naughty and seem to get away with it. But Charlie from the Chocolate Factory has surely got to be the best one. No explanation why required!

5) What inspired you to work within children's education?

I resisted being a teacher for years because my parents, grand-parents, aunt... etc etc etc had all been teachers. I went off to join the Army as a foreign language interpreter and was told time and time again: "You'd make a great teacher - why not go to the Adjutant's General Corps instead?" In the end, I discovered I did love teaching, and teaching teens was where I could make a difference. By the time they were in the Army, though, they'd already have made their mind up about languages so I thought I'd have a go at teaching at high school. It was the right decision. I'm still alive, and the battles I see these days are ones where teachers try to resist the phenomenal change going on around them.